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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27-33

The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in head-and-neck conditions


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, The National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Malaysia
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surger, Hospital Angkatan Tentera Tuanku Mizan, Ministry of Defence, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4 Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, Hospital Angkatan Tentera Tuanku Mizan, Ministry of Defence, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Syed Nabil
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, The National University of Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jhnps.jhnps_16_20

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Introduction: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been suggested to be beneficial in managing compromised acute and chronic wounds. To shed some light on its effectiveness in head-and-neck wounds, a retrospective review on the use of HBOT was done. Materials and Methods: The medical records of patients receiving HBOT for head-and-neck conditions were reviewed. The demographics and clinical data were collected. Results: Seventeen patients were identified. Four major indications for therapy were identified being osteoradionecrosis (ORN) treatment, ORN prophylaxis, treatment of compromised flaps/grafts, and treatment of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Favorable outcome following HBOT was seen in 77% of patients. In the treatment of ORN, 56% cases treated were successful. In the remaining groups, 100% success rates were obtained. The majority of patients had HBOT as an adjunctive treatment. HBOT as an adjunct was successful in 71% of patients, while prophylactic HBOT were successful in all patients. Complications including ear barotrauma and sinus squeeze were seen in 24% of patients. Conclusions: HBOT can be successfully used in various head-and-neck conditions, especially when used in cases with compromised flaps/graft or ORN prophylaxis. It is well tolerated and thus provides a valid adjunctive therapy in the management of tissue with compromised healing capability in the head-and-neck region.


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